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We Failed to Fully Manifest Malcolm X’s Vision

Malcolm X/ Courtesy image 

As We approach what would have been Malcolm X’s 93rd birthday, it’s important, now more than ever, to closely examine matters related to Black Nationalism, and our noble ancestor’s Pan-African vision, in which the masses of Black people living in the United States identify with, and strive to build significant connections with, Black people living in Africa, and more generally oppressed humans around the globe.

In the midst of an impending global war precipitated by the United States and Israel, widening wealth inequality domestically, and a perpetual loss of geopolitical footing among Black nations and entities, many among Us still refuse to embrace the revolutionary philosophy that prioritizes Our collective interests, at all levels of sociopolitical engagement, above that of other racial and political groups, so-called allies or otherwise.

In the era of Donald Trump, amnesia seems to have taken over segments of the global Black community, enamored by mainstream calls for unity from so-called white progressives, all the while issues specific to Black people, at home and abroad, constantly get overlooked, just as was the case long before, and after, Trump made his now infamous “shithole” comments.

An emotional appeal to the consciousness of those who value power above all else won’t suffice at this critical juncture in Our fight for liberation. Instead, consolidation of power among the Black masses at the grassroots, and eventually higher, will bolster efforts for widespread change among those who identify as such, and have been severely affected in the global racial caste system by that classification.

However, schisms within the Black family, nationalistic, cultural, and all else in between, prevent such unity. While Black people, like other racial groups, shouldn’t be expected to be a monolith, Our collective third-world status, even when one includes the wealth of Our mavens of industry, reveals common needs that supersede Our differences, many of which have been exasperated in the mainstream press and by multi-issue, left leaning interest groups. This phenomenon shows an ignorance around the mass political movement Malcolm X demanded in 1964 during his Ballot or the Bullet address.

A failure to heed Malcolm X’s words in the decades after his murder have fermented the abysmal conditions of Our existence, including intra-community violence, police-orchestrated murders, food insecurity, and low educational attainment. When the time comes for concerted action, all We can offer is reactionary movement against forces impeding Black progress, when all along We should have been prepared to tackle Our current-day issues with an established Black-centered infrastructure, ran similarly to a separate government, or at the very least, a federation of Black governing bodies.

In practicing Black Nationalism, an ideology and livity that espouses political, social, and economic self-determination and independence, in the District and abroad, D.C.’s Black community, shows an investment in the well-being of its people, while ensuring that the educated and empowered among Us work for the greater good of the Black masses, particularly the working class, instead of corporate overseers and malicious politicians.

Realizing this vision isn’t without its challenges, one of the most crucial being gentrification, a process that decimated large, majority-Black communities over the last 10 years. Pan-Africanism proves more elusive: Beyond D.C.’s “conscious community,” continental Africans and descendants of enslaved Africans remain at odds, often citing cultural differences, spurred by their allegiance to their nation, rather than the global collective.

Additionally, a “bootstrap” mentality among the Black Baby Boomer generation, a group whose conditions in the Post-Civil Rights era favored their economic advancement, creates a go-get-it-yourself attitude where Our elders, who received all the spoils of Civil Rights legislation, provide little guidance on how to pass on generational wealth. Black immigrants, also beneficiaries of past Black liberation struggles on American soil, can be indicted for similar offenses, due mainly to a penchant among a significant number to dissociate and differentiate themselves from those designated as African Americans, as if that demarcation brings shame.

This dilemma has also affected the younger generations. Black teenagers, a demographic now including the American-born sons and daughters of Black immigrants, significantly consume and influence mainstream forms of entertainment. Such programming, and real-world conditions, cause them to lack a collective Black identity rooted in love for one another, ancestral knowledge of self, and a passion for advancing Black causes in all areas of life.

The current socioeconomic landscape dissuades such a mindset, for the alternative — watching out for yourself and who you know, to the detriment of others within the community — often proves more lucrative in the eyes of those lacking race consciousness. In the age of corporate hegemony, co-optation of grassroots and organic movements by distant figures with deep pockets threatens true Black liberation. Overtly Black messages and crusades get abandoned, for softer, more “inclusive” alternatives, even as they snuff out the Black perspective. The few voices on the periphery representing pro-working class Black, anti-establishment politics get vilified, oftentimes by other Black people.

In D.C., as well as on the national stage, this trend has manifested in the arts, an industry that shapes public opinion and supports a color-blind cultural shift among Black youth, to the detriment of an identity rooted in love for self.

As they decry displacement and mass gentrification, members of D.C.’s creative class, a group overly represented by transients, Black and otherwise, perpetuate such systems while erasing the organic, raw form of the indigenous Black D.C. culture they romanticize in corporate-sponsored festivals and programming. Nationally, Black artists and athletes handpicked by the establishment as Our voices on political and social matters have defined and created, for the impressionable public, a movement devoid of class analysis and calls for a true revolution that reaches all levels of the Black liberation struggle.

On the surface, Our collective mission, in the years since Black consciousness reappeared in the mainstream, hasn’t been to form an independent Black nation. Even if this goal proved impossible at this point, Black people aren’t taking strides to build among one another, beyond the, once again reactive, short-lived mass exodus to Black-owned businesses during a boycott.

Instead of fighting for and concentrating power among Ourselves, We settle for sparse opportunities to watch corporate-sponsored artists and politicians address our gripes against America on mainstream platforms, even as their actions barely shift paradigms. Such euphoric sound bites, blown up on a bevy of social media platforms, briefly take our attention away from the real-life conditions that prevent us from attaining Black unity, while inspiring us to emulate these people, who ultimately harbor questionable motives along their advance within the system that holds back Black people.

Reversing these trends, and setting Ourselves along a path where, in every segment of Our lives, and collectively, We’re advancing the interests of the Black nation, starts with educating ourselves about the true nature of the Babylon system, all the while dedicating Our human capital, arguably our most vital resource, to eradicating said system from the inside-out, through simultaneous, incremental, and methodical movements similar to what the powers that be have used against us.

While learning Our revolutionary history, young people must envision and prepare to create a world where they can pursue interests conducive to the uplift of the race. Our adults must prepare to organize politically, economically, and in other sectors to support institutions that advance Black self-determination.

Last, but not least, class and ethnic divisions within the Black family must be addressed, keeping in mind that not every relationship should be salvaged, specifically with adults not committed to racial advancement or solidarity. An allegiance to community is imperative as We work together to change Our dire conditions.

Toward the end of his life. Malcolm X embraced the greater human rights struggle, understanding that holding the Babylon system accountable for its global mistreatment of Black people, through concerted action, would greatly benefit the entire human race, which as a whole been affected by inequities levied by capitalism, imperialism, and racism. Detractors and liberal apologists, white and otherwise, often paint Malcolm X’s evolution in the wrong light, calling it an abandonment of race consciousness, when in fact it’s the globalization of the Black Nationalist program he endorsed in the 1950s and 1960s.

In the United States, the epicenter of global oppression against Black people, and more specially D.C., the same movement can take place. However, like Malcolm X, we have to be passionate about our Blackness, eager to improve Our conditions through education and self improvement, and understand that, in a system buoyed by aggression and manipulation, there’s no viable alternative to Black power, even if that means starting from Our collective position at the bottom of the ladder with the few resources we possess.

Want to learn more about Malcolm X and celebrate his legacy? Take part in some events take place during Malcolm X Week.

 

 

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Ari Theresa, Esq. Sheds Light on D.C. Zoning Commission Corruption

Days before appearing on The AllEyesOnDC Show to explain how zoning laws spur gentrification, Ari Theresa, an attorney who advocates on behalf of D.C. residents facing displacement, filed a lawsuit against the Bowser Administration, its predecessors, and a bevy of D.C. government agencies, for what he described as the deliberate elimination of tight-knit D.C. communities to accommodate D.C.’s creative class: single, college-educated transients with deep pockets and little to no connection to the District of yesteryear.

This scheme, Theresa told the AllEyesOnDC audience on the night of April 20th, spans at least 12 years, starting around the time Major League Baseball came back to D.C. While the District’s bank account has exploded from the excess tax revenue brought by newcomers, significant demographic changes and rampant homelessness reflect an unprecedented housing crisis, spurred by the city’s rising cost of living in the midst of rapid development.

Mass gentrification took place throughout the Obama era, not only in D.C., but other major U.S. cities, many of which were once dubbed “Chocolate Cities.” During the show, Theresa credited transit-oriented development — the construction of lavish, one-bedroom apartments near modes of transportation for people seeking convenient commutes to and from work — as a means of destroying once culturally vibrant communities. As prices of those condos skyrocketed, working-class, Black Washingtonians, had to travel long distances for affordable accommodations, usually in the outskirts of the city that lacked commerce and a public transportation infrastructure.

With the D.C. Council deliberating on the D.C. Comprehensive Plan, a document that guides the development and placement of amenities within the District, for decades to come, Theresa predicts more trouble to come for D.C. residents. After a nearly 13-hour wait, Theresa testified before the D.C. Council in the early morning hours of March 31st. He asked D.C. Council Chair Phil Mendelson (D) why not hold the D.C. Zoning Commission accountable to following the Comprehensive Plan, an inquiry to which he said he received no suitable response.

Theresa told members of the AllEyesOnDC audience on Friday night that The D.C. Comprehensive Plan as it stands, would’ve been sufficient enough had the D.C. Zoning Commission, a body selected by the D.C. Mayor, not opt for exemptions that allow them to ignore rules that maintain the character of neighborhoods. If the D.C. Council, with the help of duplicitous ANC commissioners and other parties, have their way, the D.C. Comprehensive Plan could become more ambiguous, thus allowing for more manipulation of current laws and further breakdown of historic D.C. neighborhoods. That means that every D.C. neighborhood could experience changes like that seen in Shaw, the H Street corridor, and, to a certain degree, Petworth.

For the time being, one community — Barry Farm in Southeast — wouldn’t have to fend off developers. The week following Theresa’s appearance on The AllEyesOnDC Show, the highest court in D.C. halted plans to raze the apartment buildings that have housed low-income residents. This news culminates efforts made by Theresa and other on-the-ground actors to prevent displacement of people living in that area.

COMING SOON: The AllEyesOnDC Show Discusses Zoning Laws & Gentrification

Once approved, D.C.’s Comprehensive Plan will determine how land in the District will be used, whether it’s for the benefit of longtime residents or major developers eager to expand their influence over a gentrified city.

The stakes are high, so much so that constituents of varying ideologies and interests recently converged on the Wilson Building earlier this month, testifying before the D.C. Council into the wee hours of the morning in the hopes that the final version of the Comprehensive Plan reflects their vision for D.C.

With discussion around the Comprehensive Plan for D.C. underway, it’s time that Africans in the District understand how zoning regulations, the laws that affect the allocation of land for residences, shopping districts, and the like, enable corporations to gentrify Our communities. Ari Theresa, Esq. of Stoop Law L.L.C. will grace The AllEyesOnDC Show on Friday, April 20th at Sankofa Video Books & Cafe (2714 Georgia Avenue NW) and educate us while reflecting on his experiences in this field. This is a show you cannot afford to miss. The show starts at 8pm. 

Before you come through to witness the magic of The AllEyesOnDC Show, watch this video of Ari Theresa speaking with Sam P.K. Collins last year during Howard Homecoming. Peace and blessings!

Examining the Politics of African Unity

Obi Egbuna, Pan-African organizer, journalist, educator and playwright /Courtesy screenshot 

Beyond the need for solidarity and some cross-cultural understanding, there’s not much else that large swaths people of African descent across the world can agree on, especially when it comes to matters of political engagement.

The 2016 U.S. presidential election highlighted those schisms among Black electorates, many of whom debated the course of action oppressed people should take against corporate politicians — Republican and Democrat — that’ve treated people of African descent as a politically expendable constituency. Mainstream Black publications, politicians, and mavens of industry vilified, and ridiculed, their more radical counterparts who wanted neither Trump, or the more favorable, but neoliberal, Hillary Clinton.

More than a year after what some would consider the abysmal election of Donald J. Trump, substantial conversation about police brutality, income inequality, gentrification, and other hot-button issues specific to socioeconomically disadvantaged Black people have, in a sense, been co-opted by the fears of more well-off, more resource rich constituencies. As a result, issues pertinent to that community have taken the backseat to anxiety about President Trump’s volatile nature and unpredictability, so much so that even members of the Congressional Black Caucus seem more passionate about going toe to toe with Trump, rather than combat the forces that birthed his ascent to political power and marginalized Black people.

More importantly, some Black people still parrot misinformation about how low voter turnout among Black folks — and Russian electoral interference — helped Trump win, not the overwhelming support of white women and the power of the Electoral College. Such a situation warrants the need for an internationalist, class-centric political analysis that clearly designates our class enemies, regardless of color, and heralds the consolidation of power among low and middle-class African people and unity among Black people on all levels of engagement — local, national, and international.

On the January 2018 edition of The AllEyesOnDC Show, themed “The Politics of African Unity,” Baba Obi Egbuna, a Pan-African organizer, journalist, playwright and educator, weighed in on the current state of affairs for African people globally and outlined a game plan that could further the goal of Pan-African politically, and ultimately economic, self-determination.

This important conversation took place days before February 21, the day on which Malcolm X was assassinated and former Zimbabwean president and revolutionary Robert Mugabe was born. Egbuna’s analysis on the night of January 16th gave a nod to both Pan-African icons and called on leaders of African countries, as well as Black leaders here, to heed the calls of disillusioned grassroots organizers and young people who’re tired of the fruitless fanfare around identity politics.

Check out the video above which also includes a performance from D.C. metropolitan artist Moluba, an American-born artist whose family hails from Liberia. Peace and blessings.

 

Mama Hasinatu Tribute Promotes Kwanzaa Spirit

The spirit of Mama Hasinatu Camara was alive and well in Sankofa Video Books & Cafe on the night of Ujamma, the Kiswahili word for cooperative economics from which the fourth day of Kwanzaa gets its name. In the last years of her long and storied life, Mama Hasinatu practiced group economics when she patronized the gathering place of conscious minds, even hosting a tribute to her late comrade Kwame Ture there for two consecutive years.

Mama Hasinatu’s impact on D.C.’s African-centered community goes even further, as shown through the youth she taught at Bridges Academy, the now defunct Booker T. Washington High School, Nation House and other culturally driven educational institutions for children of African descent. Those who knew her considered her youthful disposition to be one of a kind. Even as old age crept up on her, Mama Hasinatu continued reasoning with the young people and imparting words of wisdom.

Thus were the words, and more, said about The Black Power Enforcer on the night of Friday, Dec. 29th at Sankofa, based on Georgia Avenue. The three-hour program, standing room only, attracted people of various ages, and ideologies and spiritual systems falling under the Black Power umbrella. Alma Negra Set, brainchild of Falani Spivey, a young person who grew up under Mama Hasinatu’s wing, hosted this function along with AllEyesOnDC, the monthly program on which Mama Hasinatu appeared and where she sometimes found herself along with D.C’s young people on the third Friday of the month.

Mama Hasinatu, a native Washingtonian, spent her early years on 8th and H Streets in Northeast. As a member and key organizer of the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party, Mama Hasinatu touted the benefits of scientific socialism as it relates to African liberation, while here in the United States and on her travels with Ture, the Pan-African organizer formerly known as Stokely Carmichael, in Guinea. In her role, she organized African Liberation Day celebrations throughout the 1970s and 1980s while speaking about Zionist imposition in international affairs at the expense of oppressed, melanated people. Mama Hasinatu’s activities as a then newly awaken African woman would set the stage for greater opportunities and other roles as The Black Power Enforcer until she transitioned in mid- December of last year.

For much of the night, guests poured libation, sang, played music, and reflected on the goodness of Mama Hasinatu’s time in this realm. Speakers included Mama Luci Murphy, Baba Senghor Jawara Baye, Baba Tarik Oduno, and Haile Gerima, co-owner of Sankofa Bookstore and director of the famed Sankofa film, in which Mama Hasinatu played a valuable role. Members of Mama Hasinatu’s family, sitting in the very front of the space, also counted among those in attendance that evening. Though they might of not been a part of her widespread “ideological family” as Mama Hasinatu always called her comrades, they too had valuable memories, adding photos to one of two collages erected on Sankofa’s stage. Kevin Orlando Miller, Mama Hasinatu’s eldest son and saxophonist for the Proverbs Reggae Band, entranced the audience with a short number.

The three-hour program, in its entirety, can be watched in these three videos, the longest of which is more than 1 hour, 40 minutes. Check it out and relish in Mama Hasinatu’s memory. Information about Mama Hasinatu’s homegoing services are below.

Mama Hasinatu’s Homegoing Memorial Service
Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018
10am to 5pm
Northeastern Presbyterian Church
2112 Varnum Street NE

What to a Black Nationalist is the Fourth of July?

“Woe be unto a people, a race who seek not their own foundation; their wives shall be servants for the wives of other men, and their daughters shall be wives of poor men and vagabonds, and there shall be tears because of privation, then in the end; hell everlasting for there shall be no reward in the kingdom of heaven for [the] slothful nor the unconcerned.”

Chapter 5 of The Holy Piby (1929) by Shepherd Robert Athlyi Rogers

frederick douglass
Frederick Douglass

In his 1852 speech before a group of abolitionists, titled “What to a Slave is the 4th of July?” Frederick Douglass, a former enslaved Afrikan who dedicated his life to securing physical liberty for Black men and women, gave a stirring indictment of the United States, which by that time had exponentially grown as a sovereign nation since attaining independence, all by stealing land from Indigenous people and denying freedom to generations of enslaved Afrikans who built the U.S. economy while in shackles.

Using rhetorical jujitsu, Douglass repeatedly asked his audience how Black people, many of whom U.S. law designated as property of white men and women at the time, were to celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence if their conditions hadn’t changed since 1776.

Centuries later, in the face of police brutality, non-indictments of murderous officers, contaminated water and food in majority-Black communities, lack of economic opportunity, and the reemergence of white supremacist sentiments, Black people across the United States face the same dilemma about where they fit in an America that’s vastly different, yet eerily similar to the nation Douglass worked to change.

Fortunately, Our ancestors gave Us the answer to this question many times before — via Black nationalism, Pan-Africanism, and repatriation, all of which have and still provide the means for Us to organize outside of a system that stole Our wealth and wiped out remnants of Our African identity. More importantly, these tools, should We properly use them, allow Us to unite with our sistren and brethren across the Diaspora, just as the United States government has done with the Zionists and its Western European counterparts.

There’s no better person to make this point with than Shepherd Robert Athlyi Rogers, a man driven by his divine mission to free and unite Black people. His work in the early 20th century would inspire and lay the foundation for Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, and other Black leaders who have repeatedly called out America for its crimes against humanity and pleaded with Us to build our own table, instead of sitting at the U.S. government’s.

the holy piby
Shepherd Robert Athlyi Rogers published The Holy Piby in 1929. 

More than 70 years after Douglass’ famous speech, Rogers published The Holy Piby, the foundational text of the Rastafari Movement, a global effort among oppressed people of African descent to return — mentally, spiritually, and in many cases physically — to the African continent, the place Rogers often referred to as Ethiopia in his writings. Rogers’ musings in The Holy Piby contributed to a mindset among truly revolutionary Afrikans in the West that Black people would never be truly free if they adopted the values of their enslavers, including those that forbade their pursuit of self-determination.

As founder of Afro-Athlican Constructive Gaathly, a church-like gathering space that facilitated the emergence of an African identity in Newark, New Jersey and other parts of the West, Rogers documented the work of the Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey and his Universal Negro Improvement Association in the United States, calling Garvey a prophet. Later, Leonard P. Howell and early proponents of Rastafari in Jamaica, Garvey’s birthplace, would argue that Garvey’s prediction of the coming of a Black king in the East came to fruition through the coronation of His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie I, who many Rastas consider a reincarnation of Yeshua, or Jesus Christ.

Garvey, the man We can thank for the red, black, and green of the Garvey Flag, inspired a legion of followers called Garveyites. Malcolm X’s father, killed by Klansmen in Omaha, Nebraska in the early 20th century, counted among the members of this group. Decades later, Malcolm preached unification and channeling of votes under the banner of Black Nationalism in his 1963 address “Ballot or the Bullet.” In his speech to Black people, Malcolm, who had adopted Pan-Africanism in his travels around the world, stressed that Black people overlook economic, religious, and other differences in the interest of consolidating political, social, and economic power among themselves.

malcolm
Malcolm X 

No, Malcolm didn’t tell Us to blindly join the Democratic, Republican, or even Green Party. Instead, he suggested that We as a community step outside of those entities, hold on to Our vote and cast it for the candidates who had proven themselves through policy, not speeches and cult of personality, as those who could successfully wheel and deal in the true interest of the Black Nation. Such a perspective paved the way for several Black-centered organizations of the 1970s and beyond that worked outside of the conventional American system.

These Black Nationalist organizations have proven no match for the Democratic plantation, which has taken Our vote for granted in the years since Barry Goldwater, Richard Nixon, and Ronald Reagan rallied up disgruntled, white male Southerners around contemporary anti-Blackness. Those turn of events somehow convinced Black people that Our best bet was the Democratic Party, even as the friends, colleagues, and children of our fallen leaders were cooking up alternatives in which we had direct control of the agenda.

Some Black Democrats would argue that the lack of appeal in those alternatives lies in an inability to fulfill the needs of the Black populace. The author of this piece thinks that Our collective amnesia makes Us forget how the government orchestrated the murder of our Black leaders and practically scared Us into submission. We’ve also forgotten about the squalor, government-orchestrated violence, and corruption that Democrat-controlled governments have brought Black people.

Many of Us, particularly those who still believe we can liberate ourselves within America’s diabolical two-party political system, choose to ignore the hard truths about Our situation in the United States — even after the untold number of lynchings, literal and metaphorical, over millennia. Even with institutionalized protections, the most talented among Us still face professional and emotional hurdles when they work in these white corporate spaces. The weak minded among them choose their professional ambitions over the well-being of the collective. As Walter Rodney eloquently spelled out in Groundings with My Brothers, today’s rat race is one to immerse oneself into the fabric of this “multicultural” society at the cost of one’s dignity and identity as a son or daughter of Africa.

This ignorance has risen to egregious levels several decades after the passage of the Civil Rights and Voting Rights acts, both pieces of legislation that, while they opened the door to greater political participation, failed to lift Black people out of a permanent underclass status.

Our People, enamored with the legend of Our ancestors’ struggle in Selma, Montgomery and other Civil Rights landmarks, are still holding on to the Democratic Party. Keep in mind that, in the so-called Age of Trump, Our Black elected officials, all Democratic Party figureheads in their own right, have spent more time trying to punish an unimpeachable president than advocating for their Black constituents.

This is part of a long tradition of Black politics where, in competing with others’ interests in a party that We don’t even control, we can’t push for legislation that directly affects us. The tomfoolery has gotten to the point where Black people are rallying around an ousted FBI director who once led the organization responsible Dr. King’s and Malcolm X’s death and that of so many other leaders. With all of the telltale signs in front of Us, We as Black people believe that we will prosper under the murderous banner of the American empire, a capitalistic entity that continues to exploit Our people while committing atrocities against non-white people all around the world, all with whom we share a lineage directly back to the Motherland.

The time for such foolishness stops today.

Brave Afrikan men and women have told us time and time again to strip Ourselves of the American identity that’s doused in individualism, ethnocentricity, misogyny, and ignorance. It’s time that we follow that advice or perish in this contemporary fight and form our own Nation, politically, socially, and economically.

Unfortunately, there are brothers and sisters who are on the front lines of this fight who are using their platform to push the agenda of outside actors. Such actions threaten to co-opt the work being done in the grassroots, upending the progress our People have made in the modern-day liberation fight. Food for thought, Deray McKesson: When your liberation work takes you out of the street of Ferguson and into a studio where you get to interview Katy Perry about her cultural appropriation, then just know that you’re doing the work of the powers that be.

For everyone else, may We take this July 4th to fully understand that, though we’re American by name, we’re not Americans by value and heritage. It’s time we acknowledge that and use that information to build a true movement for self-determination.

 

Man Cave at Emery Heights Set to Kick Off during Father’s Day Weekend

PHOTO: Craig Hughes, DPR recreation specialist at Emery Heights Recreation Center (light blue shirt in the center), poses with members of the Man Cave planning committee after one of their meetings./ Photo courtesy of Krystal Branton 

On the weekend of Father’s Day, a gathering space will affirm its reputation as a prominent community fixture by morphing into a “Man Cave,” created specifically for boys and men in the neighborhood seeking fun and genuine intergenerational connections.

For Maureen Brown, mother of six sons and longtime resident of Brightwood community in Northwest, the timing of the Man Cave event at Emery Heights Community Center couldn’t have been better. Brown, whose children have played team sports there, said the young men in her neighborhood, now more than ever, need a safe place where they can meet older, positive male figures.

“I feel like a lot of the guys in their 20s don’t frequent Emery. The Man Cave event could give them a good perspective of what it’s about,” Brown told AllEyesOnDC, adding that older men, too could build relationships with their sons this during the event this upcoming Saturday. “I hope things like this could get the fathers involved. A lot of dads are absent because of neglect, incarceration, or just being killed on the street. It’s much different now.” Brown said.

Two out of five young men in the Brightwood and Manor Park communities live without their father in the home, according to data collected by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, based in Baltimore. While the lack of a male presence in the home has led to catastrophic outcomes in some cases, many young people have found mentors and father figures in the coaches at Emery who often impart life lessons on the field or court.

The Man Cave event builds upon the range of the offerings available to young visitors of Emery Heights, including a football and baseball program. When community members enter Emery Heights on Saturday morning, they will get to indulge in a variety of foods, courtesy of neighborhood restaurants, watch step shows and drill demonstrations, play in sports tournaments, and hear short remarks from male community leaders. WHUR 96.3’s Tony Richards will give a keynote address. The June 17th event will kick off a series of follow-up gatherings and workshops, each one focused on an aspect of the adolescent male experience.

“This is an opportunity for fathers and sons to come together and give the fathers a place in the family. I want whatever male figures in those young people lives to be recognized,” Craig Hughes, a recreation specialist at the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation of 30 years and a lead coordinator of Man Cave at Emery Heights, told AllEyesOnDC. Hughes, juggling responsibilities as a baseball coach, with other coaches, community leaders, and men of various ages, held weekly planning meetings since the beginning of the year.

“The sports program [at Emery] has been phenomenal but sports are only one piece,” Hughes added. “We’re talking about mentoring and tutoring our youth. What kind of impact are we collectively making in our young men’s lives? Let’s help them navigate through life and see what’s coming as they get older.”

In addition to the D.C. Department of Parks & Recreation, community partners include Nation of Islam Mosque #4, Metropolitan Police Department, D.C. Commission of Fathers, Men, and Boys, Ward 4 D.C. Council member Brandon Todd’s office, and ANC Commissioner Krystal Branton (Single Member District 4D05), the mind behind Man Cave. At the beginning of the year, Branton reached out to Emery Heights about housing the Man Cave program.

“Each year, we have Father’s Day, but it’s not as celebrated or popular. This would be a great time to have Man Cave. Men gather and have their spaces in the basement or shed. It’s relatable and men take pride in it,” Branton told AllEyesOnDC. Branton announced her plans for Man Cave during the ANC 4D’s last monthly meeting of 2016 amid spirited discussion about youth overlooked in the pockets of development taking place across Ward 4.

“Their space is to be open and honest like a barbershop. It’s symbolic and gives us a chance to gather those who don’t have anyone to spend Father’s Day with. It’s a way to start a great community tradition. We don’t have anything like this in Ward 4 that I know of and the reception from the community is enormous. Folks are willing to donate their time and resources and that’s greatly needed,” Branton added.

Examining African Liberation Today

More than 50 years after the formation of the Organization of African States, known today as the African Union, two important questions about the state of the project that’s African Liberation remained to be answered: 1.) What is African Liberation? and 2.) How far along are we as African people in realizing this goal?

During the May installment of the AllEyesOnDC news and artist showcase at Sankofa Video Books & Café, We set out to answer these questions.

In essence, defining African Liberation and making an honest assessment of our situation globally should be a perpetual process, especially for a group of people living in a world that propagandizes anti-Blackness in all forms of the mainstream media. Our failure to define and measure African Liberation so that it benefits us, and solely us, will ensure that outside actors, European and traitorous African alike will never be able to consolidate power and work against the interests of working class Africans across the world.

For a new generation of freedom fighters, that means including women and children in the equation. Our pivot away from a male-centered examination of our Homeland and other communities populated by people of African descent allows us to create solutions that are more wholistic and reflective of Maatic, matriarchal values imparted upon us before the European touched the African continent.

In comes in Mama Hasinatu Camara, elder freedom fighter and confidant of Kwame Ture, and Yejide Orunmila, president of African National Women’s Organization, an entity formed to address the oppression that African women face globally as a result of colonialism. Both women defined African Liberation and assessed our current situation globally. You can definitely watch the video for yourself, but in short understand that African Liberation, according to these women, mean fully and wholistically embracing a way of life in which sexism and capitalism no longer exists.

The Rhythm People Coalition Takes over Dallas

Not even torrential downpour in the Dallas/Ft. Worth metro area could snuff out the drumbeat that connects people of African descent across the globe. Nor could it deter a small, but powerful, group of artists and activists from fulfilling their vision of enlightening others about the power of said drumbeat in uniting the African Diaspora.

Last weekend, a bevy of melanated people from across the United States and around the world converged on the grounds of a large ranch, located just south of Dallas, for a weekend of dance, song, and discussion during the fifth annual DFW Africa Festival. This African-centered event served as the first stop on the NOMAD Tour, an effort to promote and preserve art, tribe, trade and culture of people of African descent.

“This tour goes around the Diaspora to promote that rhythm spirt and remind us of our ancient ancestors and what they left on their nomadic journey around the world,” Kim Poole, leader of the Rhythm People Coalition, the group that hosted the NOMAD tour, told an audience shortly before a panel discussion about education and wealth-building in Black community Saturday evening. “We must be aligned with who we are and with our destiny,” Poole, a globally renowned singer from Baltimore, said to the multigenerational audience of artists, educators, and entrepreneurs.

The panel discussion, themed “What It Means to be Black” counted among several activities that took place at the Cedar Canyon Dude Ranch in Lancaster, Texas on June 3rd and 4th. From University Hills Boulevard, passersby could see a multitude of flags, including those representing Kenya, Nigeria, Jamaica, and Pan-African unity, flailing in the wind along the outskirts of the property.

What took place at the festival however, proved nothing short of mystical.

After parking, picking up a NOMAD Tour packet, and walking into the ranch’s pavilion, guests had a number of vendors and food choices through which they could peruse. On the main stage, Sista Bey, a member of the Dallas area’s Pan-African community, kept an upbeat vibe going through much of the day, acknowledging audience members who travelled far and near and encouraging guests to buy Black and follow in the footsteps of those who are homeschooling their children. Later, Bey poured libations and called the ancestors into the space. Underneath Bey were Kente clothes of various colors and patterns along with bamboo trees.

Other activities on Saturday evening included self-defense workshops and a gun demonstration, during which experienced brothers dissembled an AR-15 and touted gun ownerships and safety to onlookers. Children safely frolicked around the space in their multi-colored dashikis and people of the Diaspora, including Queen Diambi of the Luba tribe in the Congo, relished in the moment, forging new connections.

“I go around trying to meet people of African descent wherever they are. This is the calling of the ancestors to connect with another experience. We have to reconcile our experiences and put them together,” Diambi told AllEyesOnDC during an interview in the ranch’s pavilion. That weekend, Diambi, crowned by her village elders in 2011, met with other African-centered groups and people as part of her mission.

“We need Africans in the West to be well versed in the culture and resources. We also need you to help us realize the value of what we have. They don’t know the riches. You can be a wonderful mirror to recognize the wealth we have in your traditional systems to elevate our consciousness,” Queen Diambi added.

Other stops on the NOMAD Tour include Paris, Portland, Jamaica, and Los Angeles, all of which will most likely include participation from those who came into contact with the Rhythm People’s Coalition in Dallas.

“I felt very good about the festival,” George Omoth, key organizer of the DFWAfrica Festival, and affiliate of the Rhythm People Coalition, told AllEyesOnDC. “It was a very big improvement and the theme of the festival is important. My goal is to share the African cultural tradition in the Diaspora,” said Omoth, a Dallas resident of more than a decade and Kenyan immigrant who has lived in the United States for 35 years.

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