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Mama Hasinatu Tribute Promotes Kwanzaa Spirit

The spirit of Mama Hasinatu Camara was alive and well in Sankofa Video Books & Cafe on the night of Ujamma, the Kiswahili word for cooperative economics from which the fourth day of Kwanzaa gets its name. In the last years of her long and storied life, Mama Hasinatu practiced group economics when she patronized the gathering place of conscious minds, even hosting a tribute to her late comrade Kwame Ture there for two consecutive years.

Mama Hasinatu’s impact on D.C.’s African-centered community goes even further, as shown through the youth she taught at Bridges Academy, the now defunct Booker T. Washington High School, Nation House and other culturally driven educational institutions for children of African descent. Those who knew her considered her youthful disposition to be one of a kind. Even as old age crept up on her, Mama Hasinatu continued reasoning with the young people and imparting words of wisdom.

Thus were the words, and more, said about The Black Power Enforcer on the night of Friday, Dec. 29th at Sankofa, based on Georgia Avenue. The three-hour program, standing room only, attracted people of various ages, and ideologies and spiritual systems falling under the Black Power umbrella. Alma Negra Set, brainchild of Falani Spivey, a young person who grew up under Mama Hasinatu’s wing, hosted this function along with AllEyesOnDC, the monthly program on which Mama Hasinatu appeared and where she sometimes found herself along with D.C’s young people on the third Friday of the month.

Mama Hasinatu, a native Washingtonian, spent her early years on 8th and H Streets in Northeast. As a member and key organizer of the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party, Mama Hasinatu touted the benefits of scientific socialism as it relates to African liberation, while here in the United States and on her travels with Ture, the Pan-African organizer formerly known as Stokely Carmichael, in Guinea. In her role, she organized African Liberation Day celebrations throughout the 1970s and 1980s while speaking about Zionist imposition in international affairs at the expense of oppressed, melanated people. Mama Hasinatu’s activities as a then newly awaken African woman would set the stage for greater opportunities and other roles as The Black Power Enforcer until she transitioned in mid- December of last year.

For much of the night, guests poured libation, sang, played music, and reflected on the goodness of Mama Hasinatu’s time in this realm. Speakers included Mama Luci Murphy, Baba Senghor Jawara Baye, Baba Tarik Oduno, and Haile Gerima, co-owner of Sankofa Bookstore and director of the famed Sankofa film, in which Mama Hasinatu played a valuable role. Members of Mama Hasinatu’s family, sitting in the very front of the space, also counted among those in attendance that evening. Though they might of not been a part of her widespread “ideological family” as Mama Hasinatu always called her comrades, they too had valuable memories, adding photos to one of two collages erected on Sankofa’s stage. Kevin Orlando Miller, Mama Hasinatu’s eldest son and saxophonist for the Proverbs Reggae Band, entranced the audience with a short number.

The three-hour program, in its entirety, can be watched in these three videos, the longest of which is more than 1 hour, 40 minutes. Check it out and relish in Mama Hasinatu’s memory. Information about Mama Hasinatu’s homegoing services are below.

Mama Hasinatu’s Homegoing Memorial Service
Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018
10am to 5pm
Northeastern Presbyterian Church
2112 Varnum Street NE

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Looking Back: The AllEyesOnDC Show Reveals Indigenous America

As a native Washingtonian, I’m no stranger to the slew of anti-indigenous American rhetoric and images that floods our local media, the most prominent example being the Washington Redskins name, logo, and mascot, all given to the Washington-area football for which my peers and their families have cheered on for several years.

Not even a mass movement to abolish the Redskins name has significantly curbed use of that name in recent years. The notion that We stop saying that name has elicited scoffs from Black people, many of whom refuse to identify with their indigenous American counterparts in the struggle against white supremacy.

From what I reckon, this mindset among some so-called African Americans often comes out a frustration with an American government that seemingly prioritizes the issues of other “minorities” over that of Black people.

I have no reason to contend with that point and have argued that the American government, and other white-centered entities for that matter, often turns its back on overtly Black/African interest groups in favor of those that fit the model of ambiguity that maintains a racist, capitalistic system. This plot however may be part of a grander scheme by the powers that be to box Black Americans into stringent racial categories that deny them of their connection to the hodge-podge of indigenous tribes and nations.

 

In comes Ali Sanders,a descendant of Black indigenous Americans and proponent of indigenous living in which indigenous people operate outside of the American system, the matrix that replaced their people’s ancient way of living, to build a new life for them and their family.

How do they do that? Watch this AllEyesOnDC video and find out.

The nearly two hours of footage includes information about indigenous living and the African origins of the people currently known as Native Americans. After this video and proliferation of similar information, hopefully we as people of African descent can learn to respect each other and move beyond the European-created boundaries that have divided us for far too long.

The Youth Speak!

** watermarked photo of Congress Heights metro station** 

Though young people today are speaking out more about police brutality, community violence, and displacement of Black people in major cities, the ways of the world still corrupt those who don’t understand the historical context of these events and how they dictate the code of conduct in their social circles. That, along with lack of knowledge makes them fall prey to forces that can negatively alter their life.

This summer, two youth took on the call to learn more about their revolutionary Black/African heritage and represent the Black teenage perspective on AllEyesOnDC. Our AllEyesOnDC youth representatives Roneisha and Ma’kal learned about the writing process, followed the production of a community news program, toured historic DC. staples, and saw organizing in action.

One of those instances, highlighted in this piece, came out of an experience with the New Black Panther Party less than a week before their march for affordable housing in early July. Roneisha and Ma’kal, still learning about Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism, as we all are, soaked in the sights and sounds of that July evening.

Below are their reflections:

Yes, Black People are Special

By Roneisha B. 

AllEyesOnDC Contributing Writer

Earlier this summer during a gathering hosted by the New Black Panther Party, I learned about how special it is to be a Black person and that you can only move forward by yourself. Black people are special because we have so much history and there could be a lot of information we don’t know.

Roneisha Bennett
Roneisha B.

From the meeting I now know much about the important people who came before me who did what they needed to do so the people of this generation could be free and have equal rights. White supremacy has been trying to take over our country and we have to stop it. But we can only stop it if we are united as one whole. Nothing can be done if our people are beefing with each other instead of the opposition.

One person that stood out to me was Marcus Garvey. He was important because he was an activist and the leader of the Pan-Africanist movement. He did what he needed to do during his time so the people that come after him can take on the same actions as him. Things like this aren’t taught in schools and should be because this is the history that we need to be learning. This is the history of what our people did and how it would affect us then and now. If things like this aren’t taught then the younger generation is walking around with knowledge that isn’t important. The young aren’t aware of information like this because schools only teach you certain stuff instead of the more important history.

 More young people should attend meetings like this because it makes them aware of what’s happening in the world and how it can affect them and their lives. Because of white people trying to take over, opportunities for African Americans are lessening unless we fight for what we want. You have to be your own leader and take initiative. Nothing is going to be handed out so we have to go and get it if we want it instead of letting the opposition take the power away.

We need to follow in the footsteps of those important role models and fight like our elders did. They didn’t let anything get in their way; they fought through violence but still found a way to get what they needed. Instead of trying to do exactly what they did, we can do things in the same manner they did.They aren’t our greatest leaders but we are our greatest leader. In order to do this and achieve our goals, the youth need to be one instead of taking sides. That slows us down and isn’t helpful to one another. Lending a helping hand can move the pace faster.

This is an important affair in my life because I thought activists should do the same exact thing that our ancestors did but instead you should do things differently but the same way they did it to get more of an effective outcome in general. What I mean by that is making change that will have a positive outcome for sure. All in all the whole beginning of the meeting is important to the youth because it affects their future.

Speak Up and Speak Out

By Ma’kal F. 

AllEyesOnDC Contributing Writer

What I learned during the New Black Panther Party’s meeting in July about black liberation is that it only represents Blacks and their own belief that Black people are just as good as people of other racial backgrounds. The Black Panthers started a movement about Black pride. It was a movement boost ideologies that encourage Black people to celebrate Black culture and embrace their African heritage.

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Ma’kal F.

The New Black Panthers also spoke loudly with their words so that everybody could hear them. I think the Black Panthers represents speaking loudly. I speak softly because when I was a child, my mom always told me to be quiet. All those words made me the person I am today. It’s hard for me to speak loudly because when I speak in a low voice I think everybody can hear me. It’s quiet in my household so if I were to say something everyone there could hear me. It’s not right for a person to not be able to talk loudly in their own house.

That why I thank the New Black Panther Party for helping me. If it wasn’t for the New Black Panthers, I wouldn’t know how to speak up and use my mouth. If you don’t speak up, no one can hear you Black Panther party was a revolutionary Black nationalist and socialist organization. The panthers represent courage , valor and power.

 What I also learned about Black Panther is that’s every time members of the New Black Panther Party greet each other, they say Black power. Black power is a slogan and a name for various associated ideologies aimed at achieving self- determination for people of African descent. What I would tell younger kids from my learning experience is to speak up and use your words to make sure everyone can hear you. If they can’t hear you there, is no point in talking.

Yes, Learning about African Spirituality Made Me Accepting of Christianity Again (Kind Of)

The July 2017 edition of The AllEyesOnDC Show, centered on African spiritual systems and featuring Nana Kwabena Brown of the Temple of Nyame, attracted more than 40 people, the highest number of guests we’ve had at Sankofa Video Books & Cafe for an AllEyesOnDC event since the beginning of the year. It also altered my position on Our practice of Abrahamic religions in the West, just a little bit.

That Friday evening, Nana Kwabena charted the chronological development of African spiritual systems, including those practiced by the Akan and Yoruba people, through the migration of ancient Africans escaping Islamic persecution. He also showed me, as well as the audience, how Old World belief systems manifested into habits and traditions that have persisted through Maafa and other atrocities. In this powerful interview, Nana Kwabena outlined how ancient spiritual systems determined who held the power in local African communities. Oftentimes, it were the elders with a lifetime of experience who We respected.

CAPTION: Part I of Nana Kwabena Brown’s interview with AllEyesOnDC on Friday, July 21st at Sankofa Video Books & Cafe 

CAPTION: Part II of Nana Kwabena Brown’s interview with AllEyesOnDC on Friday, July 21st at Sankofa Video Books & Cafe 

I wrapped up my interview with Nana Kwabena more appreciative of my Christian upbringing in a Liberian church and understanding of how African spiritual systems, the practice of many that continues today, set the foundation for the Abrahamic religions, also developed by ancient African people. Like other groups, my Liberian ancestors found ways to mix their spiritual systems with Christianity as a survival tactic. Although they hold up the holy cross, my people, as have others around the diaspora, maintain some remnants of their culture.

However, there’s work to be done if we are to build a strong nation that doesn’t fall prey to the ways of the Western World.

The paradigm shift that continues to threaten Our normal, peaceful way of life came long before I appeared in this body, when Europeans replaced the elements of nature We revered with caricatures of their own. These days, as other races and cultures worship spiritual beings that reflect their ancient ways and mirror their image, We’re blindly following the traditions of a people who took our ways of life and manipulated it for their enjoyment. It’s time to let go of these systems and embrace Our spirituality. At the same time, failure to understand the nuances in Our spiritual differences, even those among Us who observe Abrahamic religions, threatens any opportunity for Us as African people to come together.

At this juncture in Our liberation struggle where we’re reclaiming Our identity, celebrity worship, sexual abuse, and disrespect of elders have reached an all-time high. Celebrity and vanity often trump experience and wisdom. Babylon’s infiltration of Our families have made it so that We leave Our children’s development to the streets, television and school system. However, it wasn’t always like that. Like the Rasta livity, Our African spiritual systems allowed Us to coexist peacefully with the world and maintain balance through all aspects of Our lives.

No, we’re not born in sin. We’re Godlike beings going through a lot of Hell in the Earthly realm, all in an effort to find Ourselves and become the reflection of God created in Our mother’s womb. As a young man raised up in the Pentecostal Church, a West African one at that, it baffles me that I developed this attitude that favors looking beyond Christianity for my salvation. But it was a long time coming.

Upon learning that, and coming to terms with the fact that other spiritual systems existed before Christianity, I grew ready to dump the religion altogether in 2014, although making that leap, publicly at least, would take another year or two. A series of vitriolic attacks against Christianity and Christian organizations, to the chagrin of those who’ve known me for some time, followed. Even after my 2015 trip to Ethiopia and acquisition of knowledge about Christianity’s African origins encouraged me to embrace the Rasta livity, I still spoke out against those who erected Christmas trees during the holidays or didn’t understand the Kemetic origins of Christ’s birth and resurrection.

More of my verbal attacks recently have focused on modern-day Christian institutions I felt didn’t do the Earthly work in the same vein as the man known as Yeshua for whom this religion received its name. In one Facebook post, I said that idol worship has caused Us to wait for a Messiah to do the work that the Universe mandated We do to keep Our ecosystem running efficiently.

After the July 21st AllEyesOnDC show, I still stand by those words, looking to the ancestors, elders, sisters, and brothers who have found a way to use Christianity to fight for liberation and self-determination in their corner of the world. Those freedom fighters, including Marcus Garvey, a man I often mention on this medium, understood that the men and women in the Bible lived on the African continent, not in a fictionalized Middle East fabricated by Europeans. He, and other freedom fighters, saw themselves in those Biblical figures and events, taking their freedom into their own hands and neutralizing the Roman Catholic Church’s global manipulation of nonwhite humans.

It’s my belief, at this moment at least, that Black Christian churches around the world should, and could take on a similar mantra for service and redemption of all human beings once they start to acknowledge Christianity’s African beginnings and the presence of Africans in the Holy Bible. Those of Us who left the church, but still love our church family, can be the agents of change in this regard, slowly but surely educating Our elders and peers about that connection.

Now, more than ever, I’m ready to separate European manipulation of ancient African spiritual systems from the Africans who unknowingly work within those systems and adopt dogma destructive to Our wholistic development. At time same time, I’m passionate more than ever to study the various spiritual systems practiced on the African continent. It’s my hope that taking on this mindset will make me more patient in engaging my People when discussing Abrahamic religions in the context of Our experiences in the West. For sure, it somewhat healed a part of me

So no, I’m still not a Christian.

At the same time, I’m not going to stop attending the church I frequented as a youngster, even if it’s once every two months. For the first time in a long time, I’m going to deviate from Malcolm X’s message a bit and not keep my spirituality in the closet. Why would I do that when respectfully speaking to Black people of other backgrounds outside of their place of worship could help Us see the lineage in Our spiritual systems and unite as One?

After all, that’s the the real work in ensuring We unite as a people.

Looking Back: AllEyesOnDC Does It for the Watoto

The June 16th edition of the AllEyesOnDC Show, filmed live in Sankofa Video Books and Café, proved to be one of a kind, specifically because those featured that evening became the youngest AllEyesOnDC guests in all the grassroots media platform’s existence. This installment of AllEyesOnDC, themed “For the Watoto,” aired on Facebook Live on the International Day of the African Child, the African Union’s annual commemoration of the 1976 Soweto Uprising.

The 1976 Soweto Uprising, for those who don’t know, popped off on the morning of June 16 that year when thousands of indigenous South African youth, fed up with the European-dominated education system’s marginalization of their native tongue, skipped school and led a series of street protests. South African police officers responded to these outcries with brutal violence, killing more than 700 young protesters and jailing many more. The 1976 Soweto Uprising, which inspired several other youth-led anti-apartheid campaigns, has since been depicted on the big screen and stage.

More than 50 years later, a new generation of Black youth in the D.C. metropolitan area has taken the mantle in the fight against global white supremacy and all that manifests from it. Four of these young people graced the AllEyesOnDC stage on June 16th, sharing their stories and showcasing how they use the arts to feed their minds and enlighten the masses.

These young people – youth motivational speaker and activist Elijah Coles-Brown and three young ladies from the Mass Emphasis Children’s History & Theatre Company – kept the audience laughing, awing, and thinking hard about the future holds for Black liberation. Elijah, the first guest, spoke about his activism and causes he’s furthering through his speaking tours throughout the country. Later, he returned as caricature of Frederick Douglass, decked out in a three-piece suit and gray hair, to recite one of the abolitionist’s 1865 speeches.

That evening, the three young ladies of the Mass Emphasis Children’s History & Theatre Company spoke about their roles in “The Sisters Who Fought with Their Pens,” an on-stage tribute to Phyllis Wheatley, Ida B. Wells, and other Black women who used the written word to advance the cause of Black liberation. The trio, scheduled to appear in a play about Kwame Ture and Colin Powell in July, also spoke about how the arts have raised their consciousness and prepared them for a world in which Black children aren’t protected. That evening, the young ladies also sang, recited lines from “The Sisters Who Fought with Their Pens” and even said the names of the 54 African countries, in alphabetical order.

This video captures the entirety of the June 16th AllEyesOnDC Show at Sankofa Video Books & Café. Check it out and mark your calendars for the July 21st edition where we’ll discuss African spiritual systems.

Man Cave at Emery Heights Set to Kick Off during Father’s Day Weekend

PHOTO: Craig Hughes, DPR recreation specialist at Emery Heights Recreation Center (light blue shirt in the center), poses with members of the Man Cave planning committee after one of their meetings./ Photo courtesy of Krystal Branton 

On the weekend of Father’s Day, a gathering space will affirm its reputation as a prominent community fixture by morphing into a “Man Cave,” created specifically for boys and men in the neighborhood seeking fun and genuine intergenerational connections.

For Maureen Brown, mother of six sons and longtime resident of Brightwood community in Northwest, the timing of the Man Cave event at Emery Heights Community Center couldn’t have been better. Brown, whose children have played team sports there, said the young men in her neighborhood, now more than ever, need a safe place where they can meet older, positive male figures.

“I feel like a lot of the guys in their 20s don’t frequent Emery. The Man Cave event could give them a good perspective of what it’s about,” Brown told AllEyesOnDC, adding that older men, too could build relationships with their sons this during the event this upcoming Saturday. “I hope things like this could get the fathers involved. A lot of dads are absent because of neglect, incarceration, or just being killed on the street. It’s much different now.” Brown said.

Two out of five young men in the Brightwood and Manor Park communities live without their father in the home, according to data collected by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, based in Baltimore. While the lack of a male presence in the home has led to catastrophic outcomes in some cases, many young people have found mentors and father figures in the coaches at Emery who often impart life lessons on the field or court.

The Man Cave event builds upon the range of the offerings available to young visitors of Emery Heights, including a football and baseball program. When community members enter Emery Heights on Saturday morning, they will get to indulge in a variety of foods, courtesy of neighborhood restaurants, watch step shows and drill demonstrations, play in sports tournaments, and hear short remarks from male community leaders. WHUR 96.3’s Tony Richards will give a keynote address. The June 17th event will kick off a series of follow-up gatherings and workshops, each one focused on an aspect of the adolescent male experience.

“This is an opportunity for fathers and sons to come together and give the fathers a place in the family. I want whatever male figures in those young people lives to be recognized,” Craig Hughes, a recreation specialist at the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation of 30 years and a lead coordinator of Man Cave at Emery Heights, told AllEyesOnDC. Hughes, juggling responsibilities as a baseball coach, with other coaches, community leaders, and men of various ages, held weekly planning meetings since the beginning of the year.

“The sports program [at Emery] has been phenomenal but sports are only one piece,” Hughes added. “We’re talking about mentoring and tutoring our youth. What kind of impact are we collectively making in our young men’s lives? Let’s help them navigate through life and see what’s coming as they get older.”

In addition to the D.C. Department of Parks & Recreation, community partners include Nation of Islam Mosque #4, Metropolitan Police Department, D.C. Commission of Fathers, Men, and Boys, Ward 4 D.C. Council member Brandon Todd’s office, and ANC Commissioner Krystal Branton (Single Member District 4D05), the mind behind Man Cave. At the beginning of the year, Branton reached out to Emery Heights about housing the Man Cave program.

“Each year, we have Father’s Day, but it’s not as celebrated or popular. This would be a great time to have Man Cave. Men gather and have their spaces in the basement or shed. It’s relatable and men take pride in it,” Branton told AllEyesOnDC. Branton announced her plans for Man Cave during the ANC 4D’s last monthly meeting of 2016 amid spirited discussion about youth overlooked in the pockets of development taking place across Ward 4.

“Their space is to be open and honest like a barbershop. It’s symbolic and gives us a chance to gather those who don’t have anyone to spend Father’s Day with. It’s a way to start a great community tradition. We don’t have anything like this in Ward 4 that I know of and the reception from the community is enormous. Folks are willing to donate their time and resources and that’s greatly needed,” Branton added.

Examining African Liberation Today

More than 50 years after the formation of the Organization of African States, known today as the African Union, two important questions about the state of the project that’s African Liberation remained to be answered: 1.) What is African Liberation? and 2.) How far along are we as African people in realizing this goal?

During the May installment of the AllEyesOnDC news and artist showcase at Sankofa Video Books & Café, We set out to answer these questions.

In essence, defining African Liberation and making an honest assessment of our situation globally should be a perpetual process, especially for a group of people living in a world that propagandizes anti-Blackness in all forms of the mainstream media. Our failure to define and measure African Liberation so that it benefits us, and solely us, will ensure that outside actors, European and traitorous African alike will never be able to consolidate power and work against the interests of working class Africans across the world.

For a new generation of freedom fighters, that means including women and children in the equation. Our pivot away from a male-centered examination of our Homeland and other communities populated by people of African descent allows us to create solutions that are more wholistic and reflective of Maatic, matriarchal values imparted upon us before the European touched the African continent.

In comes in Mama Hasinatu Camara, elder freedom fighter and confidant of Kwame Ture, and Yejide Orunmila, president of African National Women’s Organization, an entity formed to address the oppression that African women face globally as a result of colonialism. Both women defined African Liberation and assessed our current situation globally. You can definitely watch the video for yourself, but in short understand that African Liberation, according to these women, mean fully and wholistically embracing a way of life in which sexism and capitalism no longer exists.

The Rhythm People Coalition Takes over Dallas

Not even torrential downpour in the Dallas/Ft. Worth metro area could snuff out the drumbeat that connects people of African descent across the globe. Nor could it deter a small, but powerful, group of artists and activists from fulfilling their vision of enlightening others about the power of said drumbeat in uniting the African Diaspora.

Last weekend, a bevy of melanated people from across the United States and around the world converged on the grounds of a large ranch, located just south of Dallas, for a weekend of dance, song, and discussion during the fifth annual DFW Africa Festival. This African-centered event served as the first stop on the NOMAD Tour, an effort to promote and preserve art, tribe, trade and culture of people of African descent.

“This tour goes around the Diaspora to promote that rhythm spirt and remind us of our ancient ancestors and what they left on their nomadic journey around the world,” Kim Poole, leader of the Rhythm People Coalition, the group that hosted the NOMAD tour, told an audience shortly before a panel discussion about education and wealth-building in Black community Saturday evening. “We must be aligned with who we are and with our destiny,” Poole, a globally renowned singer from Baltimore, said to the multigenerational audience of artists, educators, and entrepreneurs.

The panel discussion, themed “What It Means to be Black” counted among several activities that took place at the Cedar Canyon Dude Ranch in Lancaster, Texas on June 3rd and 4th. From University Hills Boulevard, passersby could see a multitude of flags, including those representing Kenya, Nigeria, Jamaica, and Pan-African unity, flailing in the wind along the outskirts of the property.

What took place at the festival however, proved nothing short of mystical.

After parking, picking up a NOMAD Tour packet, and walking into the ranch’s pavilion, guests had a number of vendors and food choices through which they could peruse. On the main stage, Sista Bey, a member of the Dallas area’s Pan-African community, kept an upbeat vibe going through much of the day, acknowledging audience members who travelled far and near and encouraging guests to buy Black and follow in the footsteps of those who are homeschooling their children. Later, Bey poured libations and called the ancestors into the space. Underneath Bey were Kente clothes of various colors and patterns along with bamboo trees.

Other activities on Saturday evening included self-defense workshops and a gun demonstration, during which experienced brothers dissembled an AR-15 and touted gun ownerships and safety to onlookers. Children safely frolicked around the space in their multi-colored dashikis and people of the Diaspora, including Queen Diambi of the Luba tribe in the Congo, relished in the moment, forging new connections.

“I go around trying to meet people of African descent wherever they are. This is the calling of the ancestors to connect with another experience. We have to reconcile our experiences and put them together,” Diambi told AllEyesOnDC during an interview in the ranch’s pavilion. That weekend, Diambi, crowned by her village elders in 2011, met with other African-centered groups and people as part of her mission.

“We need Africans in the West to be well versed in the culture and resources. We also need you to help us realize the value of what we have. They don’t know the riches. You can be a wonderful mirror to recognize the wealth we have in your traditional systems to elevate our consciousness,” Queen Diambi added.

Other stops on the NOMAD Tour include Paris, Portland, Jamaica, and Los Angeles, all of which will most likely include participation from those who came into contact with the Rhythm People’s Coalition in Dallas.

“I felt very good about the festival,” George Omoth, key organizer of the DFWAfrica Festival, and affiliate of the Rhythm People Coalition, told AllEyesOnDC. “It was a very big improvement and the theme of the festival is important. My goal is to share the African cultural tradition in the Diaspora,” said Omoth, a Dallas resident of more than a decade and Kenyan immigrant who has lived in the United States for 35 years.

AllEyesOnDC: The “No Culture without Agriculture” Edition

No saying speaks more to Black people’s need to get back our indigenous ways than “There’s no culture without agriculture.” In the spirit of Earth Day, AllEyesOnDC wanted to focus on Our lost connection to the Earth and usher a call for getting back to our roots.

At Sankofa Video Books & Café on the night of April 21st, people in attendance, including this host, saw parallels between agriculture, genealogy, health and fitness, metaphysics, economics, and politics during a two-hour program that included interviews with Sherice, Sr., master urban farmer and leader of the Hippee Chic urban gardening/sustainability movement and Xavier Brown of Soilful City.

Baba Tarik Oduno, a fixture in the D.C. community and pioneer of “There’s no culture without agriculture,” broke down the meaning of that saying, reminding audience members that we must always honor our mothers and fathers and understand our history. After all, Baba Oduno said, “genius is in our genealogy.” Note that this segment was less of an interview, and more of a lecture, all to the audience’s benefit.

Wrapping up the evening was a demonstration by Christina Cook, a Teaching Artist Institute fellow, of how rhythm could boost communication for people on the spectrum (autism, ADHD, etc.). During this segment, five audience members, including Baba Oduno, beat on drums and learned how to create the perfect combination of rhythms – all without speaking a word to one another.

Check out this video and get a great look at what community and self-determination, as it relates to food production, looks like in the District of Columbia.

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