Search

AllEyesOnDC

Building a Black Nation, One Post at a Time

D.C. Police Harass Black People Uptown, Too

A Fourth District Metropolitan Police Department officer. / Screenshot by Sam P.K. Collins 

Peace and blessings Black African family,

In conversations about police brutality in the nation’s capital, We often shed light on the experiences of our sisters and brothers living east of the Anacostia River, in lower-income neighborhoods with a significant Black population. It’s gotten to the point where issues affecting Black people in Ward 4, one of D.C.’s more culturally and economically diverse areas, get swept under the rug.

However, We mustn’t forget that, without a central independent government and system of advocacy, Black people are outnumbered and disorganized against agents of capitalistic interests, including police officers who, by design, aren’t required to protect the people, rather the businesses in the communities under their jurisdiction. The case isn’t any different in Ward 4, which includes much of upper Northwest. The few Black men and women living in these communities, as seen in this video, remain victim from constant harassment from police officers with no community connections.

Please spread the video and make efforts to police the police in your community, so that they know harassment and intimidation can continue no longer.

 

Advertisements

Black African Political Engagement is Not a Choice!

Even as he advocated for repatriation and the forming of an independent African nation, The Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey encouraged political participation among Africans in the United States, defining politics as the process by which We ensure the government works for us. In his Ballot or the Bullet address, Malcolm X endorsed a similar philosophy, outlining a strategy that, if implemented properly, would make Black Africans’ political enemies take them more seriously.

The most successful major Black radical social-political movements preceding and succeeding Garvey and X relied on a nation-building concept in which members, while finding knowledge of self, acquired vast amounts of knowledge that prepared them to upend the mental manipulation of enemy forces that enslaved the Black masses. Leaders of those organizations used their huge following to consolidate Black power and instill fear among politicians who abhorred the idea of politically conscious and aware Black African people.

That’s why by the time we acquired the vote, one of the most important signs of residence in one’s community and a viable means of hyper-local civic engagement, the Babylon system was well on its way to discouraging Our use of it, and Our political self-determination as a whole.

The AllEyesOnDC Show PresentsThat’s why, as will be intricately explained on June 20th at Sankofa Video Books & Cafe, it’s important not only to vote as a Black Africans, but to become engaged in the political affairs of Our community so that We shape the outcomes most directly affecting Our lives. In the weeks leading up Our monthly AllEyesOnDC event, think deeply about how, during the Black Power movement, long-term political organizing, and nation building in general, had been discouraged, all so that decades later, we’re without a highly organized political infrastructure representing the interest of the Black African masses.

The murder and imprisonment of our Black radical leaders, along with the dissemination of illicit drugs in throughout majority Black communities in the late 1970s and 1980s served the purpose of, not only disconnecting Black people from their spiritual selves, but snuffing out any desire for Black Africans to amass political power. Mass incarceration provided Babylonian politicians sufficient cover to relinquish the vote from segments of the Black African community, and with it the power to navigate society through other means.

As a result, dysfunction and illiteracy have been normalized and celebrated. Instead of studying the complexity of Our environment and the deceit of those sworn to protect community interests, We shy away from politics, convincing ourselves that speaking to the Babylonians in the political arena doesn’t bring about change, even though it’s provided the tools for our contemporary dissent.

Many of Us outside of the “conscious” circles have joined the Democratic Party because they seem the most liberal of the two major parties, though its platform doesn’t support Black African self-determination. That type of thinking brought President Barack Obama into office twice, and led swaths of uninformed Black Africans to blame third-party voters, not white people, for President Trump’s win in 2016.

Even worse, many of Us, caught up in the minute-by-minute drama of national politics that don’t have much bearing on our lives relative to other aspects of the subject, take pride in not knowing our neighborhood commissioner or council members, the men and women who write legislation directly tied to our daily activities. Many of Us speak vaguely about breaking away from this nation, without any understanding of how political representation asserts the nation’s power, and proves essential in the diplomatic affairs that make nation building easier.

But then again, power may not be what we desire subconsciously.

The Black African nation, doesn’t have control over its affairs, in part because, in Our pursuit for all other markers of success, We bought into the propaganda of the American melting pot, and along with it, any substantial opportunity to organize a mass movement among Black Africans that passes down knowledge about community governance. We want to be friends with our racial peers, while they want power. Instead of producing, we consume, especially politically, as can be seen in our delusional relationship with the Democratic Party.

It’s been assumed by many Black African people that, because of the historical mistreatment of African people on U.S. soil that continues to this day, any local, state, and national government formed under the U.S. Constitution doesn’t protect African people’s interests. While that’s true, dangerous absolutist thinking has us ready to bow out of this reality instead of building our own political force that could push for conditions that encourage our eventual independence.

Notice I said eventual independence.

We’re not as independent of the American political system as we would like to believe. If we’re serious about nation building, and not only committed to Pan Africanism out of a need to follow trends, then we must develop a strategy to push back against the neighbors, Black, white, and other, who’ve taken our political silence for complicity and lack of knowledge. More specifically, We must do so as a unified front, for We carry a lot of political power when concentrated on a goal, like bringing President Obama to the White House.

In embracing Garvey’s philosophy of self-determination and independence, many of us choose to opt out of the U.S. political system at all levels. Instead of politics, We focus on entrepreneurship. We grow our own food. We build our own schools. Most importantly and most frequently spoken among those who’ve absolved from politics, We reconnect with African spiritual systems taken away from Us during enslavement and colonialism.

All of those strategies are essential, and encouraged as we continue to lay the foundation for what could be our own communities, cities, towns, and eventually nations that embody of a federation of Black African states. However, as the people of Tuskegee, Alabama, Lowndes County, Mississippi, Ferguson, Missouri, and Washington, D.C. will tell you, attempting to improve your life, or maintain a high quality of life, won’t be easy if you’re under the thumb of a local government ready to dissolve your resources, connections, and revenue streams within a matter of second.

Being civically engaged and committed to destroying the system aren’t mutually exclusive, and they don’t have to be. If you’re reading to stretch your mind a bit, study the science of voting, and remain committed to building a Black African nation, visit Sankofa Video Books & Cafe (2714 Georgia Ave NW) on Friday, July 20th at 8pm as we discuss the necessity of the vote, and civic engagement.

 

The AllEyesOnDC Show Presents “Black Music in Its Many Forms”

Featured image courtesy of Gawker

In honor of Black Music Month, and in keeping in mind its obligation to keep Black African self-determination at the forefront of Our people’s minds, the AllEyesOnDC Show explored the cultural and business aspects of Black music during the June edition of the monthly program at Sankofa Video Books & Cafe in Northwest.

Two panels featured Black musicians of different generations making a mark in the go-go, R&B, and international music genres. The OGs of the Music Game panel included Afro-Go-Go futurist Swamp Guinee, famed D.C. saxophonist K.O., and rooted songstress Afi Soul, each of whom spoke about how they used their craft to lead the masses toward Mama Africa and rich culture and history of the Diaspora. The panelists also spoke about protecting their intellectual property and wholeness of their sound.

After a musical performance from Charles O’More, Dusty of Tru Expressionz go-go band and R&B singer Ihsan Bilal, representing The New School,  graced the stage to speak about how they’ve used social media to broaden their appeal and connect with their audiences. Dusty, a millennial who lives in Northwest, spoke about how he parlayed his work in the go-go industry into videography and clothing. Bilal, an alumna of the Duke Ellington School of the Arts, said she used her music as a force to unify and create a cultural understanding.

Watch the video above to get a full understanding of the magic that took place on The AllEyesOnDC Show.

 

There’s No Nation Building without Black Love #SayNoToDivestment

Photo courtesy of thenology.com 

Brothers and sisters, the next time you’re tempted to do away with the entire opposite gender of your race based on the actions of one, or a few, scorned lovers of the past, please take a second to consider that those who have wronged you may be dealing with trauma from which they need to heal, or, just like many of Us, are caught up in a sea of perspectives, customs and traditions about love and sexuality that’s unbecoming of conscious African-centered women and men.

As our three panelists, each of whom touched on the spiritual, mental, and financial aspects of Black Love, clearly articulated on the May 11th special edition of The AllEyesOnDC Show, the latter is often the case in matters involving Black men and women embroiled in toxic relationships. In failing to become our most best selves, We plague our outlook on dating and fall short in inspiring the best out of Our partner.

That’s why We must revamp the dialogue and prioritize the procreation of healthy children and families, ensured through the union between conscious Black men and women. Without the culturally rich experience an African-centered rites-of-passage, those of Us who don’t have knowledge of self struggle to develop a healthy identity in this spiritually unbalanced society.

By taking on habits and thoughts that lower Our vibration, We don’t ascend to greater heights in consciousness, and in turn, look for, and expect, the wrong qualities in our partners, often dictated to us by a foreign ideology centered exclusively on accentuated physical attributes, vanity, and other asinine markers of success in the Babylon system.

A lack of love for self, and that for the opposite sex, manifests differently in the spiritual, mental, and financial realms, all to the detriment of the nuclear family. Without prioritizing Our holistic development, in the interest of Our sanity and community welfare, Nation building no longer becomes the focus. This insanity must stop!

In classic AllEyesOnDC form, this panel provides the keys essential to becoming the best person possible for your partner, and the African nation at large. Watch, enjoy, and spread the word.

 

In Elaborate Coverup, Paul PCS Defames & Fires Effective English Teacher

Paul Public Charter School/ Courtesy Photo 

Despite assurances that administrators would prioritize teacher safety, and that of the greater school population, an overtly opaque investigation into a student’s alleged attempted assault against an instructor, the latest in a series of questionable events to take place in a D.C. charter school, recently culminated in the instructor’s termination, with no explanation from school officials.

On Thursday afternoon, the now former Paul Public Charter School employee, Sam P.K. Collins, while on paid administrative leave, received a phone call from school leadership announcing the “severance” of their relationship. This transpired just hours before Paul PCS hosted its annual My Brother’s Keeper banquet, a community event to celebrate the male-bonding initiatives and trips that took place throughout the year at the school, the majority of which Collins recruited students for and participated.

The attempted assault, carried out by a male student of color Collins had taught this past academic year, took place 10 days earlier, on the afternoon of May 14th, and ended with the student on top of Collins. Security personnel was nowhere in sight for more than 10 minutes.

That afternoon, the young man abruptly walked into Collins’ classroom, ignoring him and bumping into other students, as the instructor stood at the front door and passed out the classwork for that day. The student then sat away from his peers as Collins, a co-teacher, and nearly 15 other young people made their way to the more-than-a-dozen desks formed in a circle in the middle of the room.

For much of the class, as other students followed Collins’ instruction, the student in question, just as he had done several times before, plugged his headphones into his iPhone, pulled out several sheets of paper and started doodling before working on assignments for other classes. The co-teacher, who had been working with the young man in the weeks leading up to the incident, motioned him to come over the circle, a request he denied. After glancing at the young man, Collins started the lesson hoping that he would change his mind.

More than 15 minutes into the 53-minute class, Collins, seeing that the student was still enamored by his doodles, stopped the lesson, walked over to the young man’s desk, gently grabbed the papers, being intentional about only touching the papers, not the young man. The student, surprised and perturbed, took his headphones out of his ears and demanded his papers, yelling “Give me back my shit” to Collins.

At that point, Collins told the young man, in a stern but calm manner, “You have to do work related to English and Language Arts in this class. Only that work and nothing else.” Shortly after, Collins backed away from the young man’s desk, walking backwards to the tan locker across the classroom, where he intended to lock the student’s drawings for the remainder of class.

By the time Collins reached the locker, the young man had gotten from behind his desk and started walking toward the teacher. The co-teacher, most likely sensing the student’s desire to retaliate, stretched out her hand and pulled him away from Collins in an effort to diffuse the situation. In those few seconds, Collins pulled out his keys and successfully opened the locker, placing one door between himself and the young man so that he could open the other side and secure the materials.

Unfortunately, the co-teacher’s efforts didn’t suffice. As Collins attempted to close the locker, the young man walked over to him, fists balled up. Seconds later, he swung a right hook at Collins, who, in self-defense, bear hugged the student. What followed was a scuffle during which the young man tried to break free of Collins’ grip, swinging his fists into Collins’ back and whispering “Yeah nigga, yeah nigga” in his ear.

Three minutes into the quasi-wrestling match, the male student tripped up Collins and proceeded to get on top of him. At that time, Collins, trying to avoid getting punched while on his back, held the student’s hands back and squirmed on the floor with the student on top of him before the co-teacher pulled him off and ordered the other students out of the room and against the lockers in the hallway.

As the co-teacher pulled the alleged assailant by his hand into another classroom, Collins followed behind the pair, in deep labored breaths, asking him why would he try to punch a teacher. Seconds later, Collins gained composure, walking back to his classroom and leading students to their desks to continue the lesson. Shortly after, security personnel and school administrators, just as Collins got back into the lesson, called him out of class to start the investigation, which included submission of his written statement, and interviews with administrators and the Metropolitan Police Department.

That afternoon would be the last time Collins’ students would see him, sweating and disheveled, in the teaching capacity.

Journalist Turned Educator

Photo for AllEyesOnDC FlyerDuring his nearly two-year tenure at Paul PCS, Collins gained a reputation as an instructor who cared deeply for students’ academic and personal success, taking on a teaching style that integrated English instruction with other disciplines in a manner that facilitated students’ holistic education. A self-avowed Pan-Africanist who started openly embracing a Black Nationalist philosophy as an adult adolescent, Collins often described writing and reading to his students as means to self-determination, encouraging his Black and Latino students to read deeply and for themselves, all while providing deep historical and cultural context for the stories they would read as a class.

In February, after submitting a presentation proposal, Collins, with the encouragement of school leadership, represented Paul PCS at the Rubicon Curriculum Conference in Pittsburgh, where he gave a presentation titled “Equipping Our Black Students with Knowledge of Self” to a group of teachers and education policy experts. Collins was the only Black male participant in the entire program. Weeks later, he would divulge the specifics of his presentation to Paul staff during a weekly meeting. At the time of his termination, Collins was slated to teach U.S. History next school year and assist Paul PCS in a curriculum revamp.

Before teaching at Paul PCS, Collins served as a substitute teacher at a bevy of D.C. charter schools and an instructor at an African-centered homeschool. The transition to full-time education happened amid a prolific, and ongoing, journalism career that included stints at ThinkProgress and The Washington Informer, a local Black-owned newspaper where Collins, now 28, launched W I Bridge, a monthly millennial magazine. In 2015, disillusioned by the effects of gentrification on D.C.’s cultural economy, Collins launched The AllEyesOnDC Show, a grassroots media program that hosted live news events at We Act Radio in Southeast before moving to Sankofa Video Books & Cafe in Northwest.

Collins, a native Washingtonian of Liberian descent, has deep roots in the Paul, and Ward 4, community, having attended the institution shortly after it gained its charter in 2001 before matriculating to Banneker Academic High School in Northwest two years later. During that stint as a middle school student, Collins whetted his appetite for journalism and advocacy, helping launch The Paul Post student newspaper and serving on the Student Government Association, as vice president, and later president.

Memories of a positive Paul experience, and the potential for recreating such memories for his students, motivated Collins to wake up at 5:30am every morning and make the less-than-a-mile trek from his home to Paul PCS, to start work nearly an hour before the start of the school day.

More than anything else, Collins wanted to ensure that students understood the value of discipline and perseverance on their academic journey. So much so, he embraced policies and procedures brought on by senior school officials, who, after a slew of firings last school year and dramatic changes in leadership, promised continuity and fidelity to the rules, to the benefit of students and teachers.

Despite skepticism among co-workers that work conditions would improve, Collins persevered, upholding the rules the best way he could, asking students to tuck in their shirts while walking down the halls, discouraging use of cell phones and unauthorized stairwells, and chastising students who chronically skipped class. Those efforts, in a world where the higher ups prioritized PARCC test scores and PMF data over character development, often proved futile, foreshadowing the circumstances that led to Collins’ termination.

Long Ignored Institutional Breakdowns

First came the use the unauthorized stairwells in front of administrators, an action students often found themselves carrying out while in a rush. Next, swarms of students on the third floor, where Collins’ class was located, along with other sections of the school, would often congregate and loiter when they should be in class. This type of activity most often took place during first period, before and after lunch, and toward the end of the school day; all without a dean or security guard in sight.

In the past, senior officials have stood in the shadows while, during his class, Collins had to step outside his door to gather loud, loitering students out of the restroom. The administrator that time, also Collins’ supervisor, said nothing to the five or so students skipping their class that morning. She would later write about him, in an evaluation, that he “unknowingly” ill serves students.

This administrator completed and submitted this document, based on an observation of an early April class, to Collins May 15th, the day after he defended himself against his alleged assailant.

Months earlier, during a meeting between Paul PCS’ CEO, director of schools, and teachers, Collins, to the chagrin of some of his colleagues, recounted the lack of a strong adult presence on the third floor hallway, stretching several feet between the high school section and middle school corridor, during time windows where student foot traffic was highest. Beyond the seven or so teachers whose classes lined the hallways, the lack of vigilant adults, particularly those who held significant institutional power, often complicated efforts to corral students into class between transitions, each one taking three minutes. Without the presence of security guards or a grade-level dean, students wouldn’t get into class until, oftentimes, more than 10 minutes after it started.

During classes, when all students should be accounted for and in class, the same group of young people would post up between the Boys Bathroom and the water fountain. Whenever the bell rings, these same young people often line up against a set of lockers awaiting the bell to ring so they can roam the halls, attend their friends’ lunch cycle, or play in the school gymnasium, for another 53 minutes at a time. If not there, these students would be holed up in administrators’ offices, passing the time without a valid explanation.

In the months and weeks leading up to the May 14th incident, the lack of consistent security and leadership presence in the hallways took a toll on Collins and affected his relationship with students, many of whom felt emboldened by their newfound freedom to be out of uniform, blast music from headphones, curse freely at instructors, and engage in acts of violence. As one of the few adults to openly address these concerns with students, without the backing of higher ups until after the fact, Collins often stood by himself against students hellbent on doing whatever they wanted.

Early in the second semester, at the end of the school day as students gathered their belongings to exit the building, a colleague, noticing a melee in the works, motioned Collins to come over to the middle of the hall. Seconds later, Collins had to help break up a fight, getting punched by one of the students in the face in his attempts to quell the pandemonium. Security was nowhere in sight during this incident.

The next incident, during which Paul PCS fell short in protecting people, resulted in student injury. On the last day of Black History Month, while most of the high school was enthralled in an assembly, a violent scuffle took place on the third floor unbeknownst to anyone. One of the students involved, earlier in the year, allegedly flipped a table at a teacher in a fit of rage.

When a concerned student reported the incident to Collins, he told his supervisor who then assured him that administrators had the situation under control. What followed was an adjudication process clouded in secrecy, during which one of the alleged assailants walked into the school building though being suspended. Since that mishap, administrators, in what has been described as a reactive measure, release daily “Do Not Admit” lists that include names of suspended students.

More recent instances of student violence, or the threat of student violence, affected Collins more personally.

During the latter part of last month, a young man who vandalized the Boys Bathroom, in front of security, was allowed to go on a field trip after the fact. During that incident, which happened during a grade-wide transition to lunch, Collins walked into the bathroom upon hearing a disturbance. Once inside, Collins saw the large, green trash can dragged across the room and a toilet paper teepee over the stalls. Soon after, he saw the young man exit one of the bathroom stalls with a roll of toilet paper in his hand. After asking him to give the paper, the young man refused. At that point, Collins asked a colleague to come in and calm down the student. That teacher’s words didn’t help quell the situation.

A week later, after running down the hallway at track-star speed, pummeling a young lady, and getting up in a female teacher’s face, another student threatened Collins’ safety after he briskly walked down the hallway and asked the young man to leave the entrance of the girl’s restroom.

Again, security was nowhere to be found nor the dean, who was supposed to be posted up in the hallways during transition. Late into this incident, the dean grabbed the young man as he got in Collins’ face, spat obscenities and threatened physical harm. This would be the second documented instance when said student threatened Collins’ life. Noticing a pattern, school leaders suspended the student for two days and promised a mediation between Collins and the student upon his return.

Instead of two days, the student served one. The mediation never came to fruition.

Character Assassination Veiled as an Investigation

Time and time again, especially in the weeks leading up the May 14th incident, Collins spoke to the grandmother of the alleged aggressor about his behavior and veiled threats, often along the lines of “See me after school.” Long before that, at the end of the first quarter, Collins and the young man attended an impromptu mediation session led by a senior school official who was close with the young man’s family.

During that session, Collins bumped the young man’s grade up a couple points so that he would pass with a 70 percent for the advisory. For Collins, this served less as a means to “cook the books,” as is often and vaguely mandated by administrators, and more as encouragement that would hopefully pay dividends later in the year.

Despite several promises from the young man to improve academically and show Collins respect, his behavior showed little to no change. In addition to not completing work, the young man skipped class, and failed to attend the after-school detentions that Collins hosted for students who needed to make up work they didn’t complete. After skipping detention for the fourth time during the third quarter, school leaders gave the young man an in-school suspension and later sent him home. Upon his return to school, school officials promised a meeting between Collins and the young man’s grandmother. That meeting never happened, another disappointment amid a sea of unanswered home calls, caused by attempts by the student to intercept Collins’ outreach as he would later discover.

At the beginning of the year, the student revealed his apprehension about reading, compelling Collins to help him pass 10th grade English for the school year, as long as the young man wanted to do so. By the fourth quarter, with the student’s overall grade well below passing, but still high enough to make it, even on the margins, he had given up on himself.

Collins, noticing this, asked the student on repeated occasions to attend class more consistently and get one-on-one tutoring after school. Though this student wasn’t on her caseload, the co-teacher threw her hat in the ring, assisting the young man with his assignment twice.

As the young man’s other teachers have stated in private conversations with Collins, his disdain for his instructor overshadowed any desire to pass the English class. What transpired instead were attempts to get administrators on his side, including a time when a grade-level dean called Collins out of his room during instruction period the young man skipped to speak to him about his academic status.

During Paul PCS’ investigation, Collins outlined these events to administrators, thinking for a moment they would show some impartiality.

On the afternoon of Monday, May 21st, he tried to find a quiet location in a Miami shopping center to speak with Charlotte Spann, Paul PCS’ director of schools, and Erin Fisher, the high school principal, in a video conference during which they collected more information about what took place a week earlier and the circumstances around it.

Long before May 14th, Collins requested five instructional days, between the 16th and 22nd, for a family vacation, which Fisher granted. However after employing self-defense tactics, and at the bequest of administrators, he would start his vacation early, staying home on the 15th while they started gathering evidence.

This May 21st interview, supposedly serving as Collins’ elaboration of an earlier written statement, was peppered with questions about his actions, more so than the young man’s. As Fisher took notes, Spann, in a suspicious tone, asked if Collins had touched the young man’s chest and had him in a headlock during the incident. She later questioned the manner in which Collins took the student’s paper, and visibly showed confusion about why Collins stepped into the hallway with his students after the co-teacher pulled the young man out of the classroom.

During the interview, Spann briefly mentioned that she took testimony from other teachers, although only one was directly involved, without any specificity about the line of questions they received. Though Collins remained calm, what popped up in the back of his mind at the time were memories of perplexed looks from colleagues who would see the familial nature of his relationship with his students. Another memory that came to mind was that of a colleague, the week prior to the May 14th incident, warning Collins about being married to the rules to the point where an inconsistent administration would terminate the “militant Black man.”

For three more days, the cat-and-mouse game continued, diminishing Collins’ confidence in Paul PCS’ ability to settle this matter with all the facts and context in mind. A day later, back in D.C. and anxious about his future at Paul PCS, Collins received a phone call from Spann who said administrators would prolong the investigation two additional days to gather more evidence.

Collins, frustrated at this point, pleaded with Spann to closely examine the greater forces at play, specifically the weak security presence and lack of consistently implemented rules and school culture that threaten teachers’ safety.

In that moment, Spann paused before telling Collins in a defensive tone that none of that should be of concern at the moment, and matters related to institutional practices would be resolved after the investigation. Minutes later, the conversation ended.

Two days later, HR personnel would call Collins to break the news of his termination as an employee.

Self-Defense: A Natural Right in a Place with No Rules

It can’t be taken for granted that adolescents, undergoing a period of rapid developmental and emotional change, will often make mistakes. As the adults in the space, teachers are often encouraged to diffuse situations and utilize the protocols in place the correct student behavior. Convention holds that those who get into a physical altercation with students aren’t fit to teach.

However, the author of this piece, who’s at the center of this controversy, disagrees, imploring readers near and far to look at the issue in deeper context. The information laid out prior shows

1. ) A breakdown in procedures and customs gave young people the impression that they could do whatever they want without consequence.

2.) School administrators don’t value teachers who uphold the rules and hold others accountable to standards that were put in place at the beginning of the year and

3.) In an effort to save face and sweep a prevalent issue under the rug, school administrators, chock full of biases against strong Black men confident in their Afrocentricity and encouraging of that in others, upheld stereotypes about Black masculinity in cutting ties with a person who has contributed significantly to the academic and social culture of their institution.

Naysayers may question the credibility of this statement, citing the confidence with which the authors walks around the building and boldness with which he talks to students when encouraging, and redirecting them. However, please understand that the author of this piece feared for his safety and physical health on the afternoon of May 14th.

In those seconds, out of the watchful eye of security, he had a decision to make. In enacting self-defense measures, he was very careful to not harm the student.

The goal was self-defense, not assault or retaliation, while in the capacity as a teacher, a responsibility that obligates someone to ensure the continuity of systems in the classroom, and the safety of students, and themselves. There are laws on the book across the country that state this. These laws, like the one referenced below, have protected teachers when utilized adequately.

Section 5-E2403 of The District of Columbia School Discipline Laws and Regulations states that teachers could overcome allegations of corporal punishment, similar to what this author has faced, when in self-defense to a degree that’s comparable to what the aggressor has unleashed, and the least intrusive means of quelling the situation. That’s exactly what happened on May 14th when this student swung a punch at the author, and he bear hugged him.

School officials, however, didn’t see it that way, choosing to avoid the hard questions and the possibility of investigations into institutional practices.

However, with this article and subsequent follow-up efforts, the tide will change for teachers caught in similar situations daily at Paul PCS and elsewhere.

We Failed to Fully Manifest Malcolm X’s Vision

Malcolm X/ Courtesy image 

As We approach what would have been Malcolm X’s 93rd birthday, it’s important, now more than ever, to closely examine matters related to Black Nationalism, and our noble ancestor’s Pan-African vision, in which the masses of Black people living in the United States identify with, and strive to build significant connections with, Black people living in Africa, and more generally oppressed humans around the globe.

In the midst of an impending global war precipitated by the United States and Israel, widening wealth inequality domestically, and a perpetual loss of geopolitical footing among Black nations and entities, many among Us still refuse to embrace the revolutionary philosophy that prioritizes Our collective interests, at all levels of sociopolitical engagement, above that of other racial and political groups, so-called allies or otherwise.

In the era of Donald Trump, amnesia seems to have taken over segments of the global Black community, enamored by mainstream calls for unity from so-called white progressives, all the while issues specific to Black people, at home and abroad, constantly get overlooked, just as was the case long before, and after, Trump made his now infamous “shithole” comments.

An emotional appeal to the consciousness of those who value power above all else won’t suffice at this critical juncture in Our fight for liberation. Instead, consolidation of power among the Black masses at the grassroots, and eventually higher, will bolster efforts for widespread change among those who identify as such, and have been severely affected in the global racial caste system by that classification.

However, schisms within the Black family, nationalistic, cultural, and all else in between, prevent such unity. While Black people, like other racial groups, shouldn’t be expected to be a monolith, Our collective third-world status, even when one includes the wealth of Our mavens of industry, reveals common needs that supersede Our differences, many of which have been exasperated in the mainstream press and by multi-issue, left leaning interest groups. This phenomenon shows an ignorance around the mass political movement Malcolm X demanded in 1964 during his Ballot or the Bullet address.

A failure to heed Malcolm X’s words in the decades after his murder have fermented the abysmal conditions of Our existence, including intra-community violence, police-orchestrated murders, food insecurity, and low educational attainment. When the time comes for concerted action, all We can offer is reactionary movement against forces impeding Black progress, when all along We should have been prepared to tackle Our current-day issues with an established Black-centered infrastructure, ran similarly to a separate government, or at the very least, a federation of Black governing bodies.

In practicing Black Nationalism, an ideology and livity that espouses political, social, and economic self-determination and independence, in the District and abroad, D.C.’s Black community, shows an investment in the well-being of its people, while ensuring that the educated and empowered among Us work for the greater good of the Black masses, particularly the working class, instead of corporate overseers and malicious politicians.

Realizing this vision isn’t without its challenges, one of the most crucial being gentrification, a process that decimated large, majority-Black communities over the last 10 years. Pan-Africanism proves more elusive: Beyond D.C.’s “conscious community,” continental Africans and descendants of enslaved Africans remain at odds, often citing cultural differences, spurred by their allegiance to their nation, rather than the global collective.

Additionally, a “bootstrap” mentality among the Black Baby Boomer generation, a group whose conditions in the Post-Civil Rights era favored their economic advancement, creates a go-get-it-yourself attitude where Our elders, who received all the spoils of Civil Rights legislation, provide little guidance on how to pass on generational wealth. Black immigrants, also beneficiaries of past Black liberation struggles on American soil, can be indicted for similar offenses, due mainly to a penchant among a significant number to dissociate and differentiate themselves from those designated as African Americans, as if that demarcation brings shame.

This dilemma has also affected the younger generations. Black teenagers, a demographic now including the American-born sons and daughters of Black immigrants, significantly consume and influence mainstream forms of entertainment. Such programming, and real-world conditions, cause them to lack a collective Black identity rooted in love for one another, ancestral knowledge of self, and a passion for advancing Black causes in all areas of life.

The current socioeconomic landscape dissuades such a mindset, for the alternative — watching out for yourself and who you know, to the detriment of others within the community — often proves more lucrative in the eyes of those lacking race consciousness. In the age of corporate hegemony, co-optation of grassroots and organic movements by distant figures with deep pockets threatens true Black liberation. Overtly Black messages and crusades get abandoned, for softer, more “inclusive” alternatives, even as they snuff out the Black perspective. The few voices on the periphery representing pro-working class Black, anti-establishment politics get vilified, oftentimes by other Black people.

In D.C., as well as on the national stage, this trend has manifested in the arts, an industry that shapes public opinion and supports a color-blind cultural shift among Black youth, to the detriment of an identity rooted in love for self.

As they decry displacement and mass gentrification, members of D.C.’s creative class, a group overly represented by transients, Black and otherwise, perpetuate such systems while erasing the organic, raw form of the indigenous Black D.C. culture they romanticize in corporate-sponsored festivals and programming. Nationally, Black artists and athletes handpicked by the establishment as Our voices on political and social matters have defined and created, for the impressionable public, a movement devoid of class analysis and calls for a true revolution that reaches all levels of the Black liberation struggle.

On the surface, Our collective mission, in the years since Black consciousness reappeared in the mainstream, hasn’t been to form an independent Black nation. Even if this goal proved impossible at this point, Black people aren’t taking strides to build among one another, beyond the, once again reactive, short-lived mass exodus to Black-owned businesses during a boycott.

Instead of fighting for and concentrating power among Ourselves, We settle for sparse opportunities to watch corporate-sponsored artists and politicians address our gripes against America on mainstream platforms, even as their actions barely shift paradigms. Such euphoric sound bites, blown up on a bevy of social media platforms, briefly take our attention away from the real-life conditions that prevent us from attaining Black unity, while inspiring us to emulate these people, who ultimately harbor questionable motives along their advance within the system that holds back Black people.

Reversing these trends, and setting Ourselves along a path where, in every segment of Our lives, and collectively, We’re advancing the interests of the Black nation, starts with educating ourselves about the true nature of the Babylon system, all the while dedicating Our human capital, arguably our most vital resource, to eradicating said system from the inside-out, through simultaneous, incremental, and methodical movements similar to what the powers that be have used against us.

While learning Our revolutionary history, young people must envision and prepare to create a world where they can pursue interests conducive to the uplift of the race. Our adults must prepare to organize politically, economically, and in other sectors to support institutions that advance Black self-determination.

Last, but not least, class and ethnic divisions within the Black family must be addressed, keeping in mind that not every relationship should be salvaged, specifically with adults not committed to racial advancement or solidarity. An allegiance to community is imperative as We work together to change Our dire conditions.

Toward the end of his life. Malcolm X embraced the greater human rights struggle, understanding that holding the Babylon system accountable for its global mistreatment of Black people, through concerted action, would greatly benefit the entire human race, which as a whole been affected by inequities levied by capitalism, imperialism, and racism. Detractors and liberal apologists, white and otherwise, often paint Malcolm X’s evolution in the wrong light, calling it an abandonment of race consciousness, when in fact it’s the globalization of the Black Nationalist program he endorsed in the 1950s and 1960s.

In the United States, the epicenter of global oppression against Black people, and more specially D.C., the same movement can take place. However, like Malcolm X, we have to be passionate about our Blackness, eager to improve Our conditions through education and self improvement, and understand that, in a system buoyed by aggression and manipulation, there’s no viable alternative to Black power, even if that means starting from Our collective position at the bottom of the ladder with the few resources we possess.

Want to learn more about Malcolm X and celebrate his legacy? Take part in some events take place during Malcolm X Week.

 

 

Ari Theresa, Esq. Sheds Light on D.C. Zoning Commission Corruption

Days before appearing on The AllEyesOnDC Show to explain how zoning laws spur gentrification, Ari Theresa, an attorney who advocates on behalf of D.C. residents facing displacement, filed a lawsuit against the Bowser Administration, its predecessors, and a bevy of D.C. government agencies, for what he described as the deliberate elimination of tight-knit D.C. communities to accommodate D.C.’s creative class: single, college-educated transients with deep pockets and little to no connection to the District of yesteryear.

This scheme, Theresa told the AllEyesOnDC audience on the night of April 20th, spans at least 12 years, starting around the time Major League Baseball came back to D.C. While the District’s bank account has exploded from the excess tax revenue brought by newcomers, significant demographic changes and rampant homelessness reflect an unprecedented housing crisis, spurred by the city’s rising cost of living in the midst of rapid development.

Mass gentrification took place throughout the Obama era, not only in D.C., but other major U.S. cities, many of which were once dubbed “Chocolate Cities.” During the show, Theresa credited transit-oriented development — the construction of lavish, one-bedroom apartments near modes of transportation for people seeking convenient commutes to and from work — as a means of destroying once culturally vibrant communities. As prices of those condos skyrocketed, working-class, Black Washingtonians, had to travel long distances for affordable accommodations, usually in the outskirts of the city that lacked commerce and a public transportation infrastructure.

With the D.C. Council deliberating on the D.C. Comprehensive Plan, a document that guides the development and placement of amenities within the District, for decades to come, Theresa predicts more trouble to come for D.C. residents. After a nearly 13-hour wait, Theresa testified before the D.C. Council in the early morning hours of March 31st. He asked D.C. Council Chair Phil Mendelson (D) why not hold the D.C. Zoning Commission accountable to following the Comprehensive Plan, an inquiry to which he said he received no suitable response.

Theresa told members of the AllEyesOnDC audience on Friday night that The D.C. Comprehensive Plan as it stands, would’ve been sufficient enough had the D.C. Zoning Commission, a body selected by the D.C. Mayor, not opt for exemptions that allow them to ignore rules that maintain the character of neighborhoods. If the D.C. Council, with the help of duplicitous ANC commissioners and other parties, have their way, the D.C. Comprehensive Plan could become more ambiguous, thus allowing for more manipulation of current laws and further breakdown of historic D.C. neighborhoods. That means that every D.C. neighborhood could experience changes like that seen in Shaw, the H Street corridor, and, to a certain degree, Petworth.

For the time being, one community — Barry Farm in Southeast — wouldn’t have to fend off developers. The week following Theresa’s appearance on The AllEyesOnDC Show, the highest court in D.C. halted plans to raze the apartment buildings that have housed low-income residents. This news culminates efforts made by Theresa and other on-the-ground actors to prevent displacement of people living in that area.

COMING SOON: The AllEyesOnDC Show Discusses Zoning Laws & Gentrification

Once approved, D.C.’s Comprehensive Plan will determine how land in the District will be used, whether it’s for the benefit of longtime residents or major developers eager to expand their influence over a gentrified city.

The stakes are high, so much so that constituents of varying ideologies and interests recently converged on the Wilson Building earlier this month, testifying before the D.C. Council into the wee hours of the morning in the hopes that the final version of the Comprehensive Plan reflects their vision for D.C.

With discussion around the Comprehensive Plan for D.C. underway, it’s time that Africans in the District understand how zoning regulations, the laws that affect the allocation of land for residences, shopping districts, and the like, enable corporations to gentrify Our communities. Ari Theresa, Esq. of Stoop Law L.L.C. will grace The AllEyesOnDC Show on Friday, April 20th at Sankofa Video Books & Cafe (2714 Georgia Avenue NW) and educate us while reflecting on his experiences in this field. This is a show you cannot afford to miss. The show starts at 8pm. 

Before you come through to witness the magic of The AllEyesOnDC Show, watch this video of Ari Theresa speaking with Sam P.K. Collins last year during Howard Homecoming. Peace and blessings!

Two Black Millennials Reveal the Keys to a Stable Life

Courtesy photo of Black family 

Black people’s collective economic condition in the United States, and more specifically D.C., warrants some concerns about how residents of African descent, whether they arrived yesterday or have been in the District for generations, will fare amid mass corporatization, skyrocketing college debt, increasing costs of living, and the lack of conventional employment opportunities, compared to what their parents and grandparents experienced in the years after the end of the Civil Rights movement.

In recent years, many Black Millennials, part of a generation scarred by the Great Recession and disillusioned by growing income inequality, have embraced unorthodox means of financial stability. Instead of relying solely on income generated from fulltime jobs, young people, in the spirit of entrepreneurship, are creating additional revenue streams through investments in properties and forays in the stock market. This has become part of a strategy to be self-determined and avoid the pitfalls that decimated Black wealth in less than a generation.

On the March edition of The AllEyesOnDC Show, Sade Chase-Marshall and Makiri Pugh, two Black millennial entrepreneurs from the D.C. metropolitan area, revealed the paths they are blazing on their path to socioeconomic self-determination. While their stories and tips for success in the capitalist market wooed some members of the audience, it sparked a much-needed discussion about the feasibility of similar results for those struggling to make it day by day. For better or worse, the conversation also compelled Baby Boomers and members of Generation X in the audience to examine how lack of communication between elders and the youth may have contributed to intergenerational financial setbacks within the Black family.

 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑